Rhys Jones
Rhys Jones
2005-06 Harkness Fellow
Senior Lecturer
University of Auckland
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Harkness Project Title: Interventions to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care

Mentor: John Ayanian, M.D.

Placement: Harvard Medical School

Biography at time of Harkness Fellowship: Rhys Jones, M.B.Ch.B., a 2005-06 Commonwealth Fund Harkness Fellow in Health Care Policy, is a Maori public health medicine specialist and senior lecturer at Te Kupenga Hauora Maori, University of Auckland. He is co-director of the Tomaiora Maori Health Research Centre, and his research interests include ethnic disparities in health and health care, Maori men's health, child health, and traditional Maori approaches to health care. Jones is also Maori Director of Training for the Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine. He has served on a number of national and regional committees and is past chairperson of Te Ohu Rata o Aotearoa (The Maori Medical Practitioners Association). Jones received his medical degree and master of public health from the University of Auckland.

Project: Jones’ project aimed to explore the important dimensions of interventions to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in health care, with an emphasis on diabetes and cardiovascular care.  He undertook a series of organizational case studies (the HRSA Health Disparities Collaboratives, the IHS Special Diabetes Program for Indians, and Medicare managed care plans), for which he undertook key informant interviews and document review.

Current Position: Public Health Physician and Senior Lecturer, Te Kupenga Hauora Maori, School of Population Health, University of Auckland (Updated 8/2014)

 

E-mail: rg.jones@auckland.ac.nz

Selected Publications:

Jones R, Trivedi AN, Ayanian JZ. “Factors Influencing the Effectiveness of Interventions to Reduce Health Care Disparities.” Social Science & Medicine. Volume 70, Issue 3, February 2010, Pages 337-341

Jones R, Crengle S, McCreanor T. "How Tikanga Guides and Protects the Research Process: Insights from the Hauora Tane Project," Social Policy Journal of New Zealand 2006; 29:60–77.