Administrative Compensation for Medical Injuries: Lessons from Three Foreign Systems

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The United States requires patients injured by medical negligence to seek compensation through lawsuits, an approach that has drawbacks related to fairness, cost, and impact on medical care. Several countries, including New Zealand, Sweden, and Denmark, have replaced litigation with administrative compensation systems for patients who experience an avoidable medical injury. Sometimes called “no-fault” systems, such schemes enable patients to file claims for compensation without using an attorney. A governmental or private adjudicating organization uses neutral medical experts to evaluate claims of injury and does not require patients to prove that health care providers were negligent in order to receive compensation. Information from claims is used to analyze opportunities for patient safety improvement. The systems have successfully limited liability costs while improving injured patients’ access to compensation. American policymakers may find many of the elements of these countries’ systems to be transferable to demonstration projects in the U.S.

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Publication Details

Publication Date: July 11, 2011
Authors: Michelle M. Mello, David M. Studdert, Allen Kachalia, M.D., J.D.
Citation:

M. M. Mello, A. Kachalia, and D. M. Studdert, Administrative Compensation for Medical Injuries: Lessons from Three Foreign Systems, The Commonwealth Fund, July 2011.

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