Washington Health Policy Week in Review

Washington Health Policy Week in Review is a weekly newsletter that offers selected stories from the daily newsletter CQ HealthBeat.

Bush SCHIP Veto Threat Stands Despite Pelosi Plea

Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Michael O. Leavitt reiterated President Bush's promise to veto a $35 billion expansion of children's health insurance just hours after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., made a personal appeal for the president to sign the bill.

Bush to Sign Health Extenders Package

President Bush will sign into law legislation that would curb a new Medicare rule governing payments for inpatient hospital care, a White House spokesman said.

Edwards Pledges Different Health Care Tactics than Clinton

As an early proponent of universal health care coverage, Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards found himself struggling to differentiate his plan from one released last week by New York Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, the party's front-runner.

Group Urges Presidential Candidates to Highlight Chronic Disease

With health care the top domestic issue among voters as the nation heads into the 2008 elections, the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease asked presidential candidates to focus on ways to prevent, treat, and manage chronic diseases that account for more than 75 cents of every dollar spent on health care.

Report: Health Plans Have Improved, But Gains Were Fewer than Before

The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) reported that the rate of improvement for American health plans has slowed compared to previous years. While the quality of care for more than 80 million Americans improved in 2006, the gains were smaller than they have been in the past, according to the group's State of Health Care Quality 2007 report.

Weems Warns Medicare Advantage Plans About Marketing Abuses

The new head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services used his first public appearance before a group of managed care executives to warn them that public confidence in Medicare's private health plans hinges on avoiding unscrupulous marketing practices.