Washington Health Policy Week in Review

Washington Health Policy Week in Review is a weekly newsletter that offers selected stories from the daily newsletter CQ HealthBeat.

Indiana, Washington, and Rhode Island Lead the Way on Exchanges

Indiana and Washington were among three states the federal government rewarded with money for being in the forefront of setting up health insurance exchanges. This, even though both are among 26 states trying to kill the law in court.

Commonwealth Fund: Young Adults Defer Health Care Due to Costs
More than 600,000 young adults have become insured since the health overhaul law allowed them to stay on their parents' insurance plans until age 26. But a new Commonwealth Fund study also found that many of those ages 19 to 29 are going without care because of cost.
Don't Mess with Medicaid, Most Americans Say

Health policy insiders view Medicare as having more political support than Medicaid. But a new poll says the latter has many backers among the American people.

Rockefeller Study Touts Benefits of Medical Loss Ratio Regulation

A provision on medical payouts in the health care overhaul has prompted a parade of state officials to ask for waivers, arguing that their insurance markets would crumble if the new standards were imposed right away. But Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV remains one of the fiercest defenders of the section of the law that requires health insurance companies to meet new medical loss ratios.

CLASS Proposed Rule in October Will Make Major Changes to Program

Federal officials plan to issue a proposed rule in October that will make significant changes to the controversial Community Living Assistance Services and Supports (CLASS) program as envisioned by the health overhaul law, according to Assistant Secretary for Aging Kathy Greenlee.

Vermont Lays Out a Path to Single-Payer, But It's a Long Journey

Last Thursday was a day of celebration for advocates of single-payer health care when Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin signed into law a measure that's intended to pave the way for government-run health care in the Green Mountain State.