2004 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey of Adults' Experiences with Primary Care

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Countries: Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom, United States

Survey Organization: Harris Interactive

Field Dates: Australia: March 29–May 5
Canada: March 29–May 3
New Zealand: March 29–May 9
United Kingdom: March 29–May 5
United States: March 29–May 17

Sample: Random, representative samples of adults 18 and older

Sample sizes: 1,400 in Australia, 1,410 in Canada, 1,400 in New Zealand, 3,061 in U.K., and 1,401 in U.S.

Interview Method: Telephone

An effective, accessible primary care system is instrumental in improving health outcomes and keeping health costs down. It can also potentially reduce disparities in care, helping people to live healthy, productive lives. But according to this 2004 survey of patients in five industrialized nations, a serious shortfall in the delivery of safe, effective, timely, or patient-centered primary care is an international problem.

The survey assessed adults' primary care experiences in the last three years in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The researchers found widespread concerns about gaining prompt access to a doctor when sick, delays in receiving lab test results and test errors, and physicians' failure to engage patients or promote health.

To view the survey questions, download the attachment posted on the right. To read analyses of the surveys, see the Fund publications under Related Resources, on the right.

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Publication Date:
October 27, 2004