Affordable, quality health care. For everyone.

These surveys examined enrollment in consumer-driven and high-deductible plans in the early 2000s. The most recent surveys, conducted with the Employee Benefits Research Institute, found low enrollment overall. They also found that consumer-driven and high-deductible plans drew higher-income, healthier enrollees and had no impact on the uninsured.

The Complete Series

<p>Enrollment in consumer-driven and high-deductible plans still makes up a very small segment of the overall insurance market, according to the third EBRI/Commonwealth Fund Consumerism in Health Care Survey. Moreover, evidence shows that the percentage of consumer-driven plan enrollees with high incomes--above $100,000--swelled in 2007.</p>

<p>Enrollment in consumer-driven and high-deductible plans still makes up a very small segment of the overall insurance market, according to the third EBRI/Commonwealth Fund Consumerism in Health Care Survey.</p>

<p>Consumer-driven health plans are not catching on, according to the second consumerism survey released by the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) and The Commonwealth Fund.</p>

<p>The first national survey of its kind found that individuals with more comprehensive health insurance were more satisfied with their health plan than individuals in high deductible plans, with or without accounts.</p>

<p>This survey found that rising health insurance premiums have caused many employers to shift more of the cost of coverage to their employees. It also found widespread support for reforms to strengthen the job-based health insurance system.</p>