Affordable, quality health care. For everyone.

2003 International Health Policy Survey of Hospital Executives

Countries: Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and United States

Survey Organization: Harris Interactive

Field Dates: April 2003–May 2003

Sample: Random sample from largest general or pediatric hospitals in each country

Sample Sizes: 100 in Australia; 102 in Canada; 28 in New Zealand; 103 in United Kingdom; and 205 in United States

Interview Method: Telephone

Hospitals account for 40 percent of spending on health care in industrialized nations and are at the center of efforts to improve quality and control costs.

The survey found that the ability of hospitals and hospital executives to serve the needs of patients continues to be a major concern of elected representatives, citizens, and health care professionals. Compared with the U.S., hospital administrators in Canada, New Zealand, Australia, and the U.K. are more satisfied with their systems, but are struggling with greater financial challenges, capacity shortages, and inadequate facilities.

To view the survey questions, download the attachment posted at right. To read analyses of the surveys, see the Fund publications under Related Resources, on the right, or download the May/June 2004 Health Affairs article, Confronting Competing Demands To Improve Quality: A Five-Country Hospital Survey.

This publication is one in our ongoing series on International Health Policy Surveys

Publication Details

Publication Date: July 22, 2004